International Journal of Elementary Education

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Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya

Received: 7 November 2023    Accepted: 7 December 2023    Published: 22 December 2023
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Abstract

Language is the most important aspect in the life of all human beings as it is used to express inner thoughts and emotions, make sense of complex and abstract thought, to learn to communicate with others, to fulfill our wants and needs, as well as to establish rules and maintain our culture. Teachers are required to ensure ECDE learners are fully prepared and equipped with the literacy skills relevant for them to be independent in learning language for coping with their everyday lives. This has seen most of them struggle to incorporate diverse instructional resources in their language instruction as a teaching strategy. Literature has shown a majority of studies on instructional resources integration in learning and especially Information, Communication and Technology (ICT). However, minimal research relating to digital media use in ECDE language instruction hence the specific focus on influence of selected digital media tools and ECDE Language instruction. This study sought to investigate selected digital media tools and language instruction among ECDE teachers in Meru South Sub- County, Tharaka-Nithi county, Kenya. The study was guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological systems theory and social constructivism theory. To achieve the objectives descriptive survey research design was adopted. A sample of 243 respondents who included both head-teachers and ECDE teachers responded to questionnaires. Data obtained was analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Findings indicated that YouTube, WhatsApp and Facebook were the digital tools with comparably high extent of use. It was also established that use of digital media tools significantly influences ECDE language instruction. It is therefore recommended that ECDE teachers enhance the extent of use of media gadgets such as computers and tablets as well as tools such as Twitter and Instagram to enhance their benefits in language instruction. School administration should enhance digital resource base of their ECDE centres with adequate digital media gadgets and tools to promote their utilization. Administrators should also capacity build their teachers to enable them be more equipped and effective in integrating the media tools in classroom instruction.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12
Published in International Journal of Elementary Education (Volume 12, Issue 4, December 2023)
Page(s) 104-115
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Digital Media Tools, Influence of Use, Ecde, Language Instruction

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  • APA Style

    Kimani, J. N., Kangara, H., Ogembo, J. (2023). Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya. International Journal of Elementary Education, 12(4), 104-115. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12

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    Kimani, J. N.; Kangara, H.; Ogembo, J. Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya. Int. J. Elem. Educ. 2023, 12(4), 104-115. doi: 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12

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    AMA Style

    Kimani JN, Kangara H, Ogembo J. Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya. Int J Elem Educ. 2023;12(4):104-115. doi: 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12,
      author = {Julia Njeri Kimani and Hannah Kangara and John Ogembo},
      title = {Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya},
      journal = {International Journal of Elementary Education},
      volume = {12},
      number = {4},
      pages = {104-115},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijeedu.20231204.12},
      abstract = {Language is the most important aspect in the life of all human beings as it is used to express inner thoughts and emotions, make sense of complex and abstract thought, to learn to communicate with others, to fulfill our wants and needs, as well as to establish rules and maintain our culture. Teachers are required to ensure ECDE learners are fully prepared and equipped with the literacy skills relevant for them to be independent in learning language for coping with their everyday lives. This has seen most of them struggle to incorporate diverse instructional resources in their language instruction as a teaching strategy. Literature has shown a majority of studies on instructional resources integration in learning and especially Information, Communication and Technology (ICT). However, minimal research relating to digital media use in ECDE language instruction hence the specific focus on influence of selected digital media tools and ECDE Language instruction. This study sought to investigate selected digital media tools and language instruction among ECDE teachers in Meru South Sub- County, Tharaka-Nithi county, Kenya. The study was guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological systems theory and social constructivism theory. To achieve the objectives descriptive survey research design was adopted. A sample of 243 respondents who included both head-teachers and ECDE teachers responded to questionnaires. Data obtained was analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Findings indicated that YouTube, WhatsApp and Facebook were the digital tools with comparably high extent of use. It was also established that use of digital media tools significantly influences ECDE language instruction. It is therefore recommended that ECDE teachers enhance the extent of use of media gadgets such as computers and tablets as well as tools such as Twitter and Instagram to enhance their benefits in language instruction. School administration should enhance digital resource base of their ECDE centres with adequate digital media gadgets and tools to promote their utilization. Administrators should also capacity build their teachers to enable them be more equipped and effective in integrating the media tools in classroom instruction.
    },
     year = {2023}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Selected Digital Media Tools and Language Instructions Among ECDE Teachers in Kenya
    AU  - Julia Njeri Kimani
    AU  - Hannah Kangara
    AU  - John Ogembo
    Y1  - 2023/12/22
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    N1  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12
    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12
    T2  - International Journal of Elementary Education
    JF  - International Journal of Elementary Education
    JO  - International Journal of Elementary Education
    SP  - 104
    EP  - 115
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2328-7640
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijeedu.20231204.12
    AB  - Language is the most important aspect in the life of all human beings as it is used to express inner thoughts and emotions, make sense of complex and abstract thought, to learn to communicate with others, to fulfill our wants and needs, as well as to establish rules and maintain our culture. Teachers are required to ensure ECDE learners are fully prepared and equipped with the literacy skills relevant for them to be independent in learning language for coping with their everyday lives. This has seen most of them struggle to incorporate diverse instructional resources in their language instruction as a teaching strategy. Literature has shown a majority of studies on instructional resources integration in learning and especially Information, Communication and Technology (ICT). However, minimal research relating to digital media use in ECDE language instruction hence the specific focus on influence of selected digital media tools and ECDE Language instruction. This study sought to investigate selected digital media tools and language instruction among ECDE teachers in Meru South Sub- County, Tharaka-Nithi county, Kenya. The study was guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological systems theory and social constructivism theory. To achieve the objectives descriptive survey research design was adopted. A sample of 243 respondents who included both head-teachers and ECDE teachers responded to questionnaires. Data obtained was analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Findings indicated that YouTube, WhatsApp and Facebook were the digital tools with comparably high extent of use. It was also established that use of digital media tools significantly influences ECDE language instruction. It is therefore recommended that ECDE teachers enhance the extent of use of media gadgets such as computers and tablets as well as tools such as Twitter and Instagram to enhance their benefits in language instruction. School administration should enhance digital resource base of their ECDE centres with adequate digital media gadgets and tools to promote their utilization. Administrators should also capacity build their teachers to enable them be more equipped and effective in integrating the media tools in classroom instruction.
    
    VL  - 12
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Author Information
  • Department of Education, Tharaka University, Marimanti, Kenya

  • Department of Education, Chuka University, Chuka, Kenya

  • Department of Education, Chuka University, Chuka, Kenya

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